Here are some of the articles we’ve been reading around this office this week.

What’s Your Best Innovation Bet? – “New product ideas are not the only—or even the most important—outcome of this exercise. Perhaps more valuable is the big-picture perspective it can give managers—shedding new light on market dynamics and the larger-scale or longer-term opportunities before them. Only then will they be able to lead innovation in their industries rather than scramble to respond to it.”

Middle America Is More Innovative Than A Lot Of America Thinks – “In Silicon Valley, there is a value in being the rockstar entrepreneur but that’s not the same value that drives innovation in other parts of the country where people are looking to innovate in a more incremental way rather than necessarily creating the next big thing.”

4 Reasons Job Titles and Descriptions Have Become Obsolete – “As we move forward, we must strive to create a new workplace in which roles and responsibilities are not limited to job titles and descriptions – in which decisions can be made more efficiently and effectively.”

Resilience Is About How You Recharge, Not How You Endure – “The key to resilience is trying really hard, then stopping, recovering, and then trying again. This conclusion is based on biology. Homeostasis is a fundamental biological concept describing the ability of the brain to continuously restore and sustain well-being.”

How to Improve Your Sales Skills, Even If You’re Not a Salesperson – “At some point in your career, even if you’re not a salesperson, you’re going to have to sell something — whether it’s your idea, your team, or yourself. So how can you improve your sales skills, especially if you don’t pitch people often? What should you focus on first? And what should you do if you lose a sale?”

Want to be Smarter? Learn to Say “I Don’t Know” – “Uncertainty isn’t a condition to be avoided, but a tool for better decisions.”

There’s Only 1 Question You’ll Ever Need to Ask to Test Your Company’s Core Values – “Many companies proudly display their core values, but in practice those values are often just marketing.”

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